Resources

Articles of Association

The RJC Articles of Association.

Lucy's story

Lucy* lives in Northamptonshire with her three sons, one of whom needs full time care because of a disability. One night, someone broke into her house while she was asleep and stole her keys. When her oldest son returned home from a night out, her car was gone. She explains how restorative justice helped her to put her mind at rest about what happened. 

RJC impact report 2014-15

Susan's story

Susan is a restorative justice facilitator. When her bike was stolen, she was given the opportunity to experience a restorative justice conference from an entirely new perspective.

RJC principles of restorative practice - results of 2015 consultation

As part of the 2015 standards and guidance review, the RJC sought views from members on a proposed new version of the RJC Principles of Restorative Processes. In light of the consultation responses received, the 2015 version of the Principles document was produced.

RJC principles of restorative practice

As part of the 2015 standards and guidance review, the RJC sought views from members on a proposed new version of the RJC Principles of Restorative Processes. The updated 2015 version of the Principles is available below.

Restorative justice and the judiciary information pack

The RJC has published an information pack on restorative justice for the judiciary.

Restorative learning - Carr Manor Community School

An article from Resolution 52 about Carr Manor Community School.

Revising the Victims’ Code – consultation response

The RJC recently submitted a consultation response to the Ministry of Justice welcoming revised proposals to the Victims’ Code. The code of practice for victims of crime establishes minimum standards for their rights, support and protection.

Keeping children in care out of trouble – consultation response

The RJC has submitted a response to an independent review, chaired by Lord Laming and established by the Prison Reform Trust, to consider why looked after children are more likely than other children in England and Wales to get involved with the criminal justice system.

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